10:00 AM – 11:30 AM

The Museums at Stanford: Art in Silicon Valley
Location:
The Cantor Arts Center and the Anderson Collection at Stanford University

When Stanford University opened in 1891 as a memorial to the son of Leland and Jane Stanford, the Leland Stanford Junior Museum (now the Cantor Arts Center) was founded as well. Two earthquakes, a tech boom, and a name change later, the Cantor and its five-year-old neighbor, the Anderson Collection, now anchor the arts district at Stanford. Cantor and Anderson staff will offer introductions to both collections and guide you through some of the current exhibitions, including Mark Dion’s project “The Melancholy Museum: Love, Death & Mourning at Stanford,” which provides a unique opportunity to examine the origin story of cultural institutions in the region.

Get Inspired: Nurturing Creativity with Screentime
Location: 
Children’s Creativity Museum

The Children’s Creativity Museum serves children ages 2-12 and their caring adults. As a hybrid of a science center and a children’s museum, CCM has developed guidelines for the deployment of digital technology that focuses on fostering the next generation of makers and digital creators (not passive consumers). In this excursion, you will see these guidelines in action in the Making Music Studio, Robot Coding Lab, SketchTown, and Animation Studio as well as discuss the decision-making behind the exhibit design, facilitation protocols, and technology infrastructure needed.

Behind-the-Scenes at the Hearst Museum
Location: 
Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology

Take a journey behind-the-scenes into the research collections at the oldest Anthropology museum in California with the largest collection west of the Mississippi.

Beyond the Gallery: Socially-Engaged Practice
Location: 
Yerba Buena Center for the Arts

Get a behind-the-scenes look at how multidisciplinary art center Yerba Buena Center for the Arts integrates social justice with visual arts to create a campaign encouraging 2020 census participation for vulnerable and hard-to-count communities. Tour an exhibition featuring the work of artist-activists working with diverse residents to create change through art and civic engagement. Hear from one of the featured artists, and explore how museums can leverage culture as an instrument for social change.

Digging Deep at the David Ireland House
Location: 
The David Ireland House

Join the 500 Capp Street Foundation Founder Carlie Wilmans and Director Cait Molloy in conversation on 500 Capp Street. They will be discussing the behind the scenes on a turning a well-loved artist home with much needed repairs into a publicly accessible house museum. They will be highlighting the award-winning conservation on 500 Capp Street by Architectural Resource Group, opening the doors to the public in January 2016, their success in the artist guide and exhibitions program and how it brings visitors back, and the accomplishments achieved and challenges faced along the way. The 500 Capp Street Foundation was established in 2009 to preserve and make accessible the home of the late Bay Area conceptual artist David Ireland. In the spirit of Ireland — who actively curated the house and frequently opened it to visitors — 500 Capp Street conducts artist-led public tours, present a dynamic program of exhibitions and public events, and maintain a permanent archive of the artist’s extant body of work. 500 Capp Street is included in the Historic Artist Homes and Studios program a chapter of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.
*Not wheelchair accessible. 

Exhibit Development: The Exploratorium Way!
Location: 
Exploratorium

Located at Pier 15 on San Francisco Bay, the Exploratorium has a 50 year history of developing interactive science and art exhibits with a strong emphases on a iterative, in-house, prototyping process. This long history of internally driven and visitor focused development has lead to a dynamic exhibit floor of over 600 exhibits. As well as robust portfolio of exhibit partnerships from around the world. This tour will include behind the scene development stories of exhibits from our main floor, exhibits in our prototype section and a tour of our main exhibit shop, located in the center of the museum.
*The public areas of the museum are ADA accessible,  however, some parts of the shop may not be ADA accessible. This is a walking tour and participants will have to be walking or standing for the duration of the 90 min tour.

Working in Community: Arts in Chinatown with CCC
Location:
Chinese Culture Center of San Francisco

Working in Community: Arts in San Francisco Chinatown will dive deep into best practices on art in community, presented by the Chinese Culture Center of San Francisco (CCC). SF Chinatown is at the precipice of facing the kind of accelerated gentrification and displacement that has destabilized many other communities of color in San Francisco. However, the community has been resilient throughout these movements. As a community-based anchor institution, CCC will provide an excursion into the social justice history and how art and the institution plays in equity, advocacy and social justice in the neighborhood.

1:30 PM – 3:00 PM

Get Inspired: Nurturing Creativity with Screentime
Location: 
Children’s Creativity Museum

The Children’s Creativity Museum serves children ages 2-12 and their caring adults. As a hybrid of a science center and a children’s museum, CCM has developed guidelines for the deployment of digital technology that focuses on fostering the next generation of makers and digital creators (not passive consumers). In this excursion, you will see these guidelines in action in the Making Music Studio, Robot Coding Lab, SketchTown, and Animation Studio as well as discuss the decision-making behind the exhibit design, facilitation protocols, and technology infrastructure needed.

Sustainability: The Exploratorium as Exhibit
Location: 
Exploratorium

Located at Pier 15 on San Francisco Bay, the Exploratorium is en route to becoming one of the first and largest zero net energy museums in the world. With 330,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor space, the award-winning waterfront museum is itself a dynamic exhibit and living experiment in green building and sustainability. As with all Exploratorium exhibits, we invite you to join and participate in our journey. (Please wear closed toe shoes for access to mechanical rooms.)
*Parts of the museum are not accessible and extensive walking should be expected.

Access and Inclusion For All
Location: 
Asian Art Museum

In recent years, staff members at the Asian Art Museum have worked diligently to prioritize access and inclusion as key features of the museum, both in terms of the museum’s mission as well as in its operations and practices. In doing so, staff have convened a task force to suggest, plan, implement, and track our progress as an institution for making our programs, exhibitions, digital experiences, and physical spaces more accessible to the broad range of visitors. This learning excursion aims to share information with participants about our progress to date, our successes and challenges, and our various methods and approaches to this work. In many ways, access and inclusion work is complex, requiring expertise and commitment from across ranks and departments. What are some methods and approaches that staff can use to corral decentralized approaches into a coherent but nuanced institutional or organization approach? How might staff members work toward advocating for access and inclusion as a strategic priority?

Dogpatch Arts and Design Crawl
Location: 
Museum of Craft and Design

Located in the historic neighborhood of Dogpatch, the Museum of Craft and Design (MCD) is San Francisco’s only museum devoted exclusively to craft and design. Now an epicenter for San Francisco’s growing arts scene, Dogpatch was one of the few San Francisco neighborhoods to survive the great 1906 earthquake. Featuring nine blocks of historic homes, cottages, midcentury warehouses and shipyards, Dogpatch is a thriving enclave for the arts, culture and dining. Join MCD staff for a unique behind-the-scenes tour of the museum’s latest exhibitions as well as a hands-on creative experience in the MCD MakeArt Lab. Then explore a walking tour of the many galleries, design studios and artist workshops that call Dogpatch home.

9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Framing Community Exhibitions: Chinese in the Suns
Location: Chinese Historical Society of America

How does a museum with limited resources tell untold stories from various perspectives? How does a museum incorporate community voices and make inclusivity a central component when developing an exhibit? Discover how to integrate community engagement into exhibition design at the Chinese Historical Society of America (CHSA), San Francisco Chinatown’s only museum dedicated to the history of Chinese in America. Explore our Julia Morgan-designed building and our interactive history exhibitions. Then learn how CHSA works with community members to create an exhibit that reflects their unique experiences. We will share a case study of our exhibit “Chinese in the Sunset” and the collaborative process that led its design. Participants will get to design a community exhibition that is inclusive of community needs and goals, using content available to CHSA and its community partners at the time. Participants will have to consider how to design an exhibition that is portable and bilingual.

Making Exhibits with Community
Location: Oakland Museum of California

Meet OMCA exhibits staff (curators, experience developers, designers) to explore the different ways they work with community to make the Museum’s core galleries responsive to community needs and contemporary issues.

Community First: Research Access & Collections Care
Location: OMCA off site storage and galleries

What does community engagement look like in Collections Management? Tour exclusive storage spaces and learn approaches for inclusive response to access requests. Then hop back on the bus to tour Museum galleries, seeing some of the discussed collections installed.

Build It In, Don’t Bolt It On: Accessibility, Design, and Disability Arts in Museums
Location: The Contemporary Jewish Museum

This learning excursion will explore strategies for making exhibitions and museums more accessible for audiences with disabilities at the physical, virtual, and cultural levels, with the aim to go beyond compliance, and instead to celebrate the important perspectives that disabled people contribute.  The Contemporary Jewish Museum (The CJM) is teaming up with the Paul K. Longmore Institute on Disability, the LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and leading scholar on the intersections between blindness and visual art, Georgina Kleege, for a multifaceted conversation around more expansive ways for thinking about accessibility in arts and cultural spaces.  Participants will rotate through three “stations” that will include: an Accessible Design & Technology Lab with a wide range of tactile and braille media; a “Haptic Encounter” Tour that imagines new modes of engaging with art through touch; and an exclusive screening of the Superfest Disability Film Festival that dismantles assumptions and celebrates disability through film.   At each station, presenters aim to spark large-group discussion about the generative potential of Disability Arts and Culture, and opportunities for involving a diverse community of people with disabilities as cultural producers.

Reddit or not! Digital Art and Visitor Engagement
Location: San Jose Museum of Art

Join the San Jose Museum of Art’s curatorial, education, exhibitions, and digital engagement staff on an immersive behind-the-scenes tour of how various departments respond to the unique challenges and opportunities of a contemporary art exhibition. Focusing on the exhibition, “Almost Human: Digital Art from the Permanent Collection”– SJMA’s first long-term presentation of permanent collection work–SJMA staff will share methods for facilitating conversations about digital and time-based media and provide an implementation plan for discussing this work that you can apply at your own institution. This excursion includes a hands-on interpretative activity related to National Core Arts Standards and its close alignment with the Museum’s strategic plan, which places new emphasis on art and technology, and calls for SJMA to become a “borderless” museum, essential to creative life throughout San Jose and the Silicon Valley.

Design and Fundraising: Hard Hat Tour of New Exhibits
Location: Bay Area Discovery Museum

The Bay Area Discovery Museum offers innovative STEM and art programming for children ages 0 – 10 in a beautiful indoor/outdoor museum setting on 7.5 acres of National Park land at the foot of the Golden Gate Bridge, in Sausalito. We invite you to experience our $18.5mm campus renovation, designed by world-renowned architecture firm Olson Kundig. We’ll begin with behind-the-scenes tours of newly opened exhibits, including the Try It Studio (a math, coding, making and fabrication exhibit), as well as hard hat tours of spaces under construction. We’ll then break out into three sessions to give you a closer look into one of the following components of the renovation process: 1) the research-backed exhibit design process; 2) capital campaign fundraising strategies; or 3) the construction process for capital improvements to our historic buildings.
*The hard hat tour of two of our exhibits currently under construction will include uneven surfaces, gravel, and dirt, as well as a slight incline.

Site, Space, and Place: How Art in the Parks is Shaping the Cultural Landscape
Location: The Presidio of San Francisco and Headlands Center for the Arts

Take an art-filled road trip through the Golden Gate National Recreation Area to learn about the Arts in the Parks partnerships that are creating new ways of viewing and appreciating the park’s natural and cultural landscape. Discover the wonder of a tree that came to “grow” impossibly from the inside of a decommissioned military powder magazine at the hands of artist Andy Goldsworthy. Cross the Golden Gate Bridge and visit with local artists in their studios housed in artist-rehabilitated military buildings tucked into the golden hills of the Marin Headlands at the edge of the Pacific Ocean. Participants will have the opportunity to engage with and learn from Headlands Center for the Arts and park agencies the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy and the Presidio Trust.
*Headlands Center for the Arts is only partially accessible. The first floor of the building is accessible and we will take every measure to make the excursion inclusive.

Queerating Your Collections and Exhibitions
Location: GLBT Historical Society Archives and Museum

Discover what is unique about the GLBT Historical Society’s model of community-based public history and how that is reflected and deeply embedded in our queer curatorial and archival collections practices. Join archival staff for an introduction to the function of the archives and special collections and a behind-the-scenes tour of the holdings, a rare opportunity to visit the reserve normally accessible only to the society’s staff. Continue your experience at the GLBT Historical Society Museum in the Castro District to learn more about the Society’s history, mission and community-curated exhibitions that showcase the diversity of backgrounds, identities, cultures and experiences within the LGBTQ community.
*Attendees should expect uneven ground and slippery surfaces between the archives and the museum and to be standing for the duration of the behind-the-scenes tour in the stacks. 

1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Reuse, Recycle, Repurpose: Sustainable Exhibition Practices at OMCA
Location: Oakland Museum of California

Come get a behind-the-scenes look at OMCA’s Production shops and engage with the Museum’s preparator staff as they introduce you to the numerous strategies that OMCA has developed to cut down on waste and promote environmental sustainability at our institution and beyond.

Learning from Angel Island: Inclusion, Exclusion and American Immigration
Location: U.S. Immigration Station at Angel Island

Enjoy an exclusive tour of the detention barracks at the U.S. Immigration Station at Angel Island, a National Historic Landmark and a behind-the-scenes look at the new Pacific Coast Immigration Center set to open at the site later in 2020. The tour will be led by a representative from the Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation and the park interpreter. From 1910 to 1940, the U.S. Immigration Station at Angel Island processed more than a million immigrants from 82 countries. While many compare it to Ellis Island, the facility at Angel Island was primarily designed with the purpose to exclude, rather than welcome, many Pacific Coast immigrants. In particular, the station was built to enforce the Chinese Exclusion Act (1882-1943), the first law to ban a specific group from entry to this country on the basis of race or national origin. As a result, one hundred thousand Chinese immigrants were detained at Angel Island. These immigrants carved hundreds of poems on the walls of the detention barracks. Today, the U. S. Immigration Station at Angel Island is a National Historic Landmark – its precious poems a primary source testifying to a more challenging American immigrant experience. Set to open in mid-2020, the Pacific Coast Immigration Center at Angel Island State Park will offer a broader look at the opportunities and challenges faced by Pacific Rim immigrants from historic to contemporary times.

New Programming Ideas: SFMOMA’s Collections Center
Location: SFMOMA Collections Center

Join a conversational guided tour of SFMOMA’s Collections Center, an off-site facility for art care, access, and study.  We’ll explore active art spaces utilized for collections care functions, team teaching with the collection, interdisciplinary research of the collection, and problem solving for exhibitions.  A cross-departmental SFMOMA team will show spaces, describe approaches, and encourage dialogues about programming an off-site art facility. In this Learning Excursion, the group will explore how new programs are developed to utilize existing spaces and concurrent activities and how museums can bridge work between multiple sites / campuses.

Road Trip: A visit to Headlands Center for the Arts
Location: Headlands Center for the Arts

Cross the Golden Gate Bridge and visit a true gem of the Bay Area’s art scene. Nestled in the hills of the Golden Gate Nat’l Recreation Area, a former military post turned national park, this excursion provides a peak into a lesser known – but deeply supportive – aspect of the art world.
*The facility is only partially accessible; The first floor of the building is accessible and we will take every measure to make the excursion inclusive. Participants should expect some walking and several flights of stairs.

Visit the Rock: Revolutionary Alcatraz:
Location: Alcatraz Island, Golden Gate National Recreation Area

Join National Park Service rangers and discover Alcatraz Island’s revolutionary roots. While Alcatraz Island is justifiably known as a former federal penitentiary, its historical significance is much greater. 2019 marks the beginning of an 18 month commemoration of 50th anniversary of the Native Indian Occupation, 1969 to 1971. Participants will visit the new temporary exhibit, “Red Power on Alcatraz”, highlighting the Native American experience on Alcatraz from pre-1875 to present. Additionally, participants may visit the cellhouse to discover why Alcatraz was built to change incarceration in American. Those looking for an “out-of-big-house” experience can wander through the Island’s historic gardens and view the unexpected wildlife. Participants will explore the Island on a 45 minute guided walk with a National Park Service ranger, after which they will have the opportunity to choose from a variety of specialty tours.

Designing the Future: Silicon Valley Style
Location: Computer History Museum

Come to the Computer History Museum, in the heart of Silicon Valley, and learn entrepreneurship and engineering thinking and strategies to apply to your museum work and problem solving. This workshop will be led by Computer History Museum staff and Museum partner IDEO (award winning Bay Area design company) in the Museum’s new Learning Lab.

SFO Museum: Inside Look at a Museum at an Airport
Location: SFO Museum

Founded in 1980, SFO Museum remains the first and only AAM-accredited museum at an airport. We will meet in the Aviation Museum and Library for an introduction to our program, have a tour of our exhibitions in the International Terminal, and take transportation to the Airport’s newest employee building, for a behind-the-scenes tour of our back-of-house facility.
*The tour will by physically active and consist of mostly standing and walking. Our museum does not currently have assistive listening devices or touchables to provide.

Finding Your Inner-Bigness
Location: Museum of the African Diaspora

Ethnically-specific organizations proliferated in the latter half of the twentieth century as culturally-diverse visitors noticed that they were not “seeing themselves” on the walls, on staff, or in the collections of mainstream museums. As we settle into the twenty-first century and larger, majority museums work to correct this issue, these same ethnically-specific museums are finding themselves in competition with larger mainstream institutions for collections, audience, and funding. Ethnically-specific organizations proliferated in the latter half of the twentieth century as culturally-diverse visitors noticed that they were not “seeing themselves” on the walls, on staff, or in the collections of mainstream museums. As we settle into the twenty-first century and larger, majority museums work to correct this issue, these same ethnically-specific museums are finding themselves in competition with larger mainstream institutions for collections, audience, and funding.

Making Headlines: SFAC Gallery & Public Art
Location: Veterans Building, City Hall, Civic Center Plaza

The San Francisco Arts Commission (SFAC) is one of the more nationally celebrated municipal arts agencies. With a $40 million budget, SFAC oversees an award-winning public art collection which just celebrated its semi-centennial, a municipal art gallery that turns 50 this year, a $14 million grants program that has been a leader in the work of racial equity, in addition to other initiatives such as affordable space stabilization and innovative arts partnerships. But moreover, it drives a robust cultural discourse that impacts all sectors of the local arts ecology. Join us for a tour of the municipal gallery, the state-of-the-art collection storage area where a number of Civic Art Collection artworks are kept and conserved, and the open space in Civic Center, site of numerous public art commissions by Zak Ové, Zhang Huan (temporary, no longer on view) and Joseph Kosuth (permanent) among others, and the removal of the highly controversial Early Days monument. We’ll also check out the Main Library’s public art including works by Anne Hamilton and Ann Chamberlain, Enrique Chagoya, Alice Aycock and Nayland Blake, considered one of the city’s most successful examples of artwork integrated into architecture.

9:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Authentic Partnerships: Indigenous Cultural Resurgence in the Bay Area
Location: The Cultural Conservancy (TCC), Indian Valley Organic Farm and Garden, California Academy of Sciences

Visit the California Academy of Sciences in Golden Gate Park for a behind the scenes tour of the Anthropology collection, comprised of nearly 16,000 ethnographic and archaeological objects. Explore exhibits on the public floor that feature the voices of Indigenous people telling the story of cultural history and biological diversity in California. Stop by The Cultural Conservancy in the Presidio to learn about multi-faceted programs and partnerships empowering Indigenous cultures. The excursion continues with a drive across the iconic Golden Gate Bridge to the Indian Valley Organic Farm and Garden where participants will experience eco-cultural restoration in action.
*Walking required and limited seating. 

Marine Mammal Rescue, Rehab, Research, and Reach
Location: The Marine Mammal Center and California Academy of Sciences

Drive across the iconic Golden Gate Bridge into the enchanting Marin Headlands to visit The Marine Mammal Center, the World’s largest marine mammal hospital and education facility. Return to San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park for a tour of the California Academy of Sciences to see how critical marine mammal and other specimen collections are prepared, curated, and displayed.

Making it Work: Historic Structures as Storage
Location: San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park and Golden Gate National Recreation Area – Museum & Collections Programs

The San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park and Golden Gate National Recreation Area hold two of the largest collections in the National Park Service, together totaling over 12 million items with materials ranging from ship figureheads, furniture from Alcatraz Island, maritime models, diving suits, Nike missile system parts, and other military equipment. Each unit houses part of its collection in historic structures, one a former Army warehouse for troop ships, the other a coast artillery defense fortification; both have unique building considerations and ‘quirks’ that have been (or will be) addressed to make the space advantageous to museum storage. These tours and discussions will illustrate how park staff have met these challenges and/or hope to improve their current situations and allow for participants to ask questions and discuss how the parks’ solutions may apply to their own locations.