The Art of Observation: Museums and Medical Professionals

Track
Education Audience Research & Evaluation
Start Day and Time
Sunday May 7 1-2:15 p.m.
Venue and Meeting Room
275 America's Center
Description
Learn how museums are partnering with medical schools to engage professionals in observing, analyzing, and communicating about works of art to develop diagnostic skills, collaboration, and empathy. This session looks at a variety of programs offered by museums, including in-gallery programs that facilitate dialogue, sketching, writing, and other open-ended activities to build necessary skills.

Education, Audience Research & Evaluation track generously supported by the Canadian Museum for Human Rights

Learner Outcome
  1. Learn about research that shows how experiences with art help medical professionals build skills that benefit their daily work.
  2. Learn how these museum programs focus on enhancing observation and communication skills, and on fostering empathy.
  3. Learn about three models that museums have used to provide programs for medical professionals.
Speakers
Presenter: 
Amanda Blake
Role: 
Presenter
Title: 
Interim Director of Education
Organization: 
Dallas Museum of Art
Bio
Amanda Blake, Interim Director of Education and Head of Family, Access, and School Experiences, oversees all of the teaching and educational programming that occurs at the DMA. In 2010, she developed the DMA's Access Programs currently totaling 7 distinctive programs for a wide range of special needs. Amanda is dedicated to creating inclusive programming for visitors of all ages and abilities.
Presenter: 
Julia Langley
Role: 
Presenter
Title: 
Director
Organization: 
Georgetown University
Bio
As Director of the Georgetown Lombardi Arts and Humanities Program, Julia Langley works to integrate art, music, dance and expressive writing into healthcare to encourage creative and constructive responses to illness. Patients, caregivers, medical professionals and students are engaged through a variety of programming. Langley holds an MA in ancient Greek art history from UCLA and has been an educator, writer, and arts advocate for many years.
Presenter: 
Kathleen Hutton
Role: 
Presenter
Title: 
Director of Education
Organization: 
Reynolda House Museum of American Art
Bio
Kathleen Hutton, Director of Education, Reynolda House Museum of American Art in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. She develops and facilitates on-site workshops for first year, fourth year Wake Forest School of Medicine students. In 2015, she created an art exhibition on survivor's grief for the community and also pre-service and in-service healthcare professionals. A seasoned museum educator, Kathleen has an MFA in Studio Art; BA in Art History.
Presenter: 
Lorena Bradford
Role: 
Presenter
Title: 
Head of Accessible Programs
Organization: 
National Gallery of Art
Bio
Lorena Bradford is the Manager of Accessible Programs in the Education Division of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. As such, she has worked with a variety of medical professions, including first-year medical students, doctoral candidates, doctors, nurse practitioners, and social workers. Lorena has Masters' and doctoral degrees from the University of Delaware, where she focused on seventeenth-century Dutch art.
Presenter: 
Rebecca Granados
Role: 
Moderator
Title: 
Coordinator of Accessible Training and Education
Organization: 
Philadelphia Museum of Art
Bio
Rebecca Granados is the former Manager of Access Programs at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. She developed a sustainable program for visitors living with dementia, continued programs serving the disability community's younger audiences and families, and in 2015 launched a telepresence robot program. She received an M.A. in Art and Design Education from the Rhode Island School of Design focusing on accessibility in museums.