Case Study: One November Morning: Native American Exhibit Case Study

Track
Forces of Change
Start Day and Time
Monday May 8 9:30-10 a.m.
Venue and Meeting Room
$262.00  America's Center
Description
What happens when you make space for Native Americans to tell their stories in their own way? How can small museums engage with Native communities? What does a successful collaboration of large and small institutions look like? How do you prepare for sharing stories about an intensely traumatic subject like massacre? How do you measure the impact? This session presents a case study on "One November Morning," a traveling exhibition created by Cheyenne and Arapaho artists to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Sand Creek Massacre of 1864.
Learner Outcome
  1. Learn ways to support Native American artists in sharing their history.
  2. Small museum administrators will learn ways to collaborate with larger institutions.
  3. Learn ways to engage the non-Native community in considering Native issues.
Speakers
Presenter: 
George Levi
Role: 
Presenter
Bio
George Levi (Cheyenne) is an artist and an expert on ledger art. He is a descendant of survivors of the Sand Creek massacre of 1864. Levi has consulted with NMAI and the National Park Service.
Presenter: 
Katie Anderson
Role: 
Moderator
Title: 
Executive Director
Organization: 
Clark County Historical Museum
Bio
Katie Anderson has been a museum professional since 1998 working in large and small museums in four states. A BA in anthropology from Georgia State University led to an MA in museum science from Texas Tech University. In 2009, as Head of Collections, she was a founding team member of the Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix, AZ. Now she calls Vancouver, WA home and is the Executive Director of the Clark County Historical Museum.
Presenter: 
Roben White
Role: 
Presenter
Bio
Roben White (Lakota/Cheyenne) is an artist and activist. He has spent decades working to promote Native communities and solve problems in the areas of education, healthcare, sovereignty, rebuilding of communities and social structure. He often consults with elected officials and museums on issues of protocol and sovereignty. He is a descendant of survivors of the Sand Creek massacre.
Presenter: 
Steven Fountain
Role: 
Presenter
Organization: 
Washington State University
Bio
Dr. Steven M. Fountain is Clinical Assistant Professor of History at Washington State University Vancouver where he teaches early American, Native American, and environmental history. He is Coordinator for Native American Programs. His first two books, Horses of Their Own Making: An Equestrian History of Native North America and a co-authored textbook, History of American Indians: Exploring Diverse Roots, are due out in 2017.